Legbourne East Wold Primary School – Mr Watson's Blog

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Posts Tagged ‘story telling’

Literacy: The Piano – Aidan Gibbons

Posted by eastwoldblog on March 23, 2010

Our next unit of Literacy is “Film Narrative”.

In it we will be using this short animation called “The Piano” by Aidan Gibbons.

We are going to use key points in the film to discuss features and themes in film narrative.

Explore the approaches made by the film maker to create moods, pace and viewpoint.

We will also try to develop your film vocabulary by identifying how colour, light, sound and camera angles have been used to tell the narrative.

The original music for Aidan Gibbons’ film is ‘Comptine d’un Autre ètè; l’Apres-Midi’ , (or ‘Rhyme of Another Summer; Afternoon’), by Yann Tiersen. The music formed part of the soundtrack to the film ‘Amelie’, by Jean-Pierre Jeunet (not
suitable for children, but a fabulous film.)

A version of ‘The Piano’, with its original music, can be seen on Aidan Gibbons’ own site. Aidan Gibbons Website
Other versions of the film, however, features music composed by Stephen Jones, especially for it. Both pieces have a similarly haunting quality, which adds greatly to the mood of the film.

Have a watch and comment with any thoughts, ideas, feelings, emotions, questions etc… that the film raises in you mind.


Mr W.


Posted in Literacy, Mr Watson's Updates | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

David Wiesner – The Art of Visual Storytelling

Posted by eastwoldblog on March 1, 2010

It is time for a new topic in Literacy.

Over the next couple of weeks we are going to be looking at some of the work by the American author David Wiesner.

He writes his book in an unusual and I think really effective way!

We will be doing something unusual too! But I will save that for a surprise!

Here is some information about him.

From: Houghton Mifflin Books

Mr W.


David Wiesner

During David Wiesner’s formative years, the last images he saw before closing his eyes at night were the books, rockets, elephant heads, clocks, and magnifying glasses that decorated the wallpaper of his room. Perhaps it was this decor which awakened his creativity and gave it the dreamlike, imaginative quality so often found in his work.

As a child growing up in suburban New Jersey, Wiesner re-created his world daily in his imagination. His home and his neighborhood became anything from a faraway planet to a prehistoric jungle. When the everyday play stopped, he would follow his imaginary playmates into the pages of books, wandering among dinosaurs in the World Book Encyclopedia. The images before him generated a love of detail, an admiration for the creative process, and a curiosity about the hand behind the drawings.

In time, the young Wiesner began exploring the history of art, delving into the Renaissance at first — Michelangelo, Dürer, and da Vinci — then moving on to such surrealists as Magritte, de Chirico, and Dalí. As he got older, he would sit, inspired by these masters, at the oak drafting table his father had found for him and would construct new worlds on paper and create wordless comic books, such as Slop the Wonder Pig, and silent movies, like his kung fu vampire film The Saga of Butchula.

Wiesner has always been intrigued by and curious about what comes before and after the captured image. His books somehow convey the sequence of thoughts leading up to and following each picture, and that quality explain why they are frequently described as cinematic.

David Wiesner has illustrated more than twenty award-winning books for young readers. Two of the picture books he both wrote and illustrated became instant classics when they won the prestigious Caldecott Medal: Tuesday in 1992 and The Three Pigs in 2002. Two of his other titles, Sector 7 and Free Fall, are Caldecott Honor Books. An exhibit of Wiesner’s original artwork, “Seeing the Story,” toured the United States in 2000 and 2001. Among his many honors, Wiesner holds the Japan Picture Book Award for Tuesday, the Prix Sorcières (the French equivalent of the Caldecott Medal) for The Three Pigs, and a 2004 IBBY Honour Book nomination for illustration, also for The Three Pigs. Flotsam, his most recent work, was a New York Times bestseller and was recently named winner of the 2007 Caldecott Medal, making Wiesner only the second person in the award’s long history to have won three times.

Wiesner lives with his wife and their son and daughter in the Philadelphia area, where he continues to create dreamlike and inventive images for books.

Posted in Literacy | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Captain Picard tells the story of Gilgamesh

Posted by eastwoldblog on February 1, 2010

I was looking for examples of stories from other cultures and this is the one which caught my attention.

I feel it proves a point.

The alien tells the story in very unusual English, and Picard manages to understand, which proves the point I was making about how “Oral Stories” can change over time, with different re-telling.

Picard tries to remember a story he can share with the alien – as he says “Even though you won’t understand, you still want to hear it.”

He chooses the story of Gilgamesh…enjoy.

If you have any thoughts about how the alien tells the story, about how Picard understands it, or about the story Picard tells, then share them here.

Mr W.

Posted in Literacy, Mr Watson's Updates, Think about this... | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »