Legbourne East Wold Primary School – Mr Watson's Blog

A place where we can share what we are doing in class, find out more and reflect on our learning!

Posts Tagged ‘art’

WWII Art

Posted by eastwoldblog on July 3, 2011

Now that we have worked on our Propaganda Posters, the final part of the Art this term is to select an image of WWII that inspires you in some way.

Anything goes, as long as it interesting to you.

If you have something ‘personal’ or relating to your family then that’s great – but it doesn’t have to be.

Here are some examples:

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When you have an image – bring it in to school – preferably by Wednesday.

We are going to think how we might use it to create a piece of Artwork.

The results should prove interesting as your skills are really developing well!

Mr W.

Posted in Activities, Art, Mr Watson's Updates, Topic, WWII | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Viking Longhouses

Posted by eastwoldblog on November 17, 2010

In Class 4, our History topic is as you know ‘The Vikings’.

As part of this topic we have done a Home Learning Project. This was to extend the our learning and to get the children to research and develop an idea for themselves. Starting with a “Shoe Box” the task was to create a model of a Viking Longhouse.

Longhouses were usually made of wood – or stone, earth and turf, which kept out the cold better. They had no chimney or windows, so smoke from the open fire drifted out through the roof, and lamps were used for light. Beds and benches lined the walls. Other features included heather bedding, wall hangings and rugs for warmth. In the winter animals slept inside too.

The children had to think about what materials they could use to complete their model. They could draw, paint, crayon, stick…anything really but they had to BE CREATIVE!

It could be a solo project, or of course they could get the grown-ups involved too, drawing upon the skills of parents, grandparents, older (or younger!) brothers and sisters.

Six weeks were given to complete these projects, and truthfully Mr Watson was astounded by the results. It was a marvel to see the ingenuity of the children and their families. The levels of Design Technology and Art skills displayed were amazing. The majority of the Longhouses are on display in the corridor between the School Entrance and KS2.

Please feel free to come and have a look for yourselves!

 Mr W.

Posted in Children's Work, History, Mr Watson's Updates | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Heraldry – What would your ‘Coat of Arms’ say about you?

Posted by eastwoldblog on September 6, 2010

COMPARTMENT         MOTTO              SCROLL

SUPPORTERS: Men, fabulous monsters, animals etc. supporting the shield. Granted only in certain circumstances.

WREATH OR TORSE: A circlet of twisted ribbon of the colours thought to have been used originally to hide the join of the crest to the helm.

SHIELD: Shape of the shield has no significance, but the devices and charges on it are governed by strict rules.

MANTLING: Originally cloth draped over the back of the helm as protection from the sun: usually illustrated slashed and draped around the helm and shield. Much artistic license is allowed.

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Heraldry is, in its basic form, simply a means of identification. From simple beginnings of a device painted on a shield for easy identification from a distance in battle, heraldry has developed into a beautiful art from with many rules that must be strictly observed. For individuals it is a family emblem and for impersonal organisations a symbol of corporate identity. Heraldry is all around us, from a simple football shirt to complicated devices with quarterings and supporters representing the symbols of state. Even a company logo is a form of heraldry.

Information and Images from: www.sol.co.uk – Many Thanks.

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As an activity to reflect on the characteristics of our own personality – Children in Class 4 have designed a Coat of Arms for themselves.

(Hopefully some examples will follow soon!)

We talked about the Rules of Heraldry, the types of creatures/symbols and patterns used on shields and Coats of Arms.

One of the activities we tried was to describe ourselves in 3 words.

Record some of your ideas below…

WHAT THREE WORDS WOULD USE TO DESCRIBE YOURSELF?

Mr W

Posted in A Bit of Fun, History, Mr Watson's Updates, PHSE, Think about this... | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

David Wiesner – The Art of Visual Storytelling

Posted by eastwoldblog on March 1, 2010

It is time for a new topic in Literacy.

Over the next couple of weeks we are going to be looking at some of the work by the American author David Wiesner.

He writes his book in an unusual and I think really effective way!

We will be doing something unusual too! But I will save that for a surprise!

Here is some information about him.

From: Houghton Mifflin Books

Mr W.

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David Wiesner

During David Wiesner’s formative years, the last images he saw before closing his eyes at night were the books, rockets, elephant heads, clocks, and magnifying glasses that decorated the wallpaper of his room. Perhaps it was this decor which awakened his creativity and gave it the dreamlike, imaginative quality so often found in his work.

As a child growing up in suburban New Jersey, Wiesner re-created his world daily in his imagination. His home and his neighborhood became anything from a faraway planet to a prehistoric jungle. When the everyday play stopped, he would follow his imaginary playmates into the pages of books, wandering among dinosaurs in the World Book Encyclopedia. The images before him generated a love of detail, an admiration for the creative process, and a curiosity about the hand behind the drawings.

In time, the young Wiesner began exploring the history of art, delving into the Renaissance at first — Michelangelo, Dürer, and da Vinci — then moving on to such surrealists as Magritte, de Chirico, and Dalí. As he got older, he would sit, inspired by these masters, at the oak drafting table his father had found for him and would construct new worlds on paper and create wordless comic books, such as Slop the Wonder Pig, and silent movies, like his kung fu vampire film The Saga of Butchula.

Wiesner has always been intrigued by and curious about what comes before and after the captured image. His books somehow convey the sequence of thoughts leading up to and following each picture, and that quality explain why they are frequently described as cinematic.

David Wiesner has illustrated more than twenty award-winning books for young readers. Two of the picture books he both wrote and illustrated became instant classics when they won the prestigious Caldecott Medal: Tuesday in 1992 and The Three Pigs in 2002. Two of his other titles, Sector 7 and Free Fall, are Caldecott Honor Books. An exhibit of Wiesner’s original artwork, “Seeing the Story,” toured the United States in 2000 and 2001. Among his many honors, Wiesner holds the Japan Picture Book Award for Tuesday, the Prix Sorcières (the French equivalent of the Caldecott Medal) for The Three Pigs, and a 2004 IBBY Honour Book nomination for illustration, also for The Three Pigs. Flotsam, his most recent work, was a New York Times bestseller and was recently named winner of the 2007 Caldecott Medal, making Wiesner only the second person in the award’s long history to have won three times.

Wiesner lives with his wife and their son and daughter in the Philadelphia area, where he continues to create dreamlike and inventive images for books.

Posted in Literacy | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »